Kota Marudu Member of Parliament

Pes Cavus Foot Reconstruction

Pes Cavus Foot Reconstruction

Overview
A high-arched foot, or cavus foot, is a condition in which the foot has a very high arch. An excessive amount of weight is placed on the ball and heel of a high-arched foot when standing. This can lead to pain in the ball of the foot as well as excess shoe and sock wear. A high-arched foot can also be unstable and cause the heel to tilt inward, which can increase the risk for ankle sprains. People with high-arched feet often feel discomfort when walking barefoot on hard surfaces and require shoes with thick, supportive soles. If you have high-arched feet, chances are your Achilles tendon is also tight, which can contribute to metatarsalgia. However, there are some people with high-arched feet who experience no symptoms at all.

Causes
There are different causes of a high-arched foot. In many cases, the cause is unknown. In other cases, the cause is a nerve disease, clubfoot or injury. Treatment ranges from changes in shoewear to surgeries, depending on the amount of deformity and related problems.'Cavoid

Symptoms
Cavus feet tend to be stiffer than normal and may not take pressure as well as normal feet, so they may ache if How do you get rid of Achilles tendonitis? have been on your feet for a while. Some people with mild cavus feet don't notice them until they take up running or other sports, when the cavus may limit their exercise tolerance.

Diagnosis
Knowing the underlying cause of cavus foot is important because it is likely to get progressively worse when it results from neurological disorders. When cavus foot is not caused by these disorders, it usually does not change in appearance. Orthopedic surgeons work closely with pediatric neurologists to discover the cause of a child?s cavus foot in order to treat any underlying disease.

Non Surgical Treatment
If a considerable part of the deformity is flexible, a corrective orthosis should be used. For example, in forefoot-driven cavovarus, the hindfoot is flexible, and so an orthotic shoe insert incorporating lateral forefoot posting (support) and recessing under the first metatarsal will allow the hindfoot to correct. For ankle instability, the lateral side of the hindfoot post can be built up as well as the lateral forefoot post, creating a pronatory moment on the forefoot that counteracts the excessive supinatory moment in the hindfoot.

Surgical Treatment
There are numerous surgical approaches aimed at correcting the deformity and rebalancing the foot. Surgical procedures fall into three main groups. Soft-tissue procedures (e.g. plantar fascia release, Achilles tendon lengthening, tendon transfer), Osteotomy (e.g. metatarsal, midfoot or calcaneal), Bone stabilising procedures (e.g. triple arthrodesis).There are numerous surgical approaches aimed at correcting the deformity and rebalancing the foot. Surgical procedures fall into three main groups.
Soft-tissue procedures
Plantar fascia release, achilles tendon lengthening, tendon transfer.
Osteotomy
Metatarsal, midfoot or calcaneal
Bone stabilising procedures
Triple arthrodesis.'Cavoid